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Seaport Academy explores with microscopes

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At Seaport Academy, science education isn’t about drills and worksheets. We motivate students with hands-on manipulatives, interactive apps, three dimensional animations, connections to the world around then, and labs. Here we’re learning how to explore the microscopic world with a microscope.

Seaport class microscope
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Microscope insect bee leg
We examine animal fur, scales and skin, plant pollen, seeds and leaves, and insect parts.

Here we see a student’s point-of-view when discovering the anatomy of a honeybee leg.

 

 

 

 

 

Compound microscope

Used when a specimen is translucent (some light passes thru it)

Usually higher power 10x to 300x

The observer sees all the way thru the specimen being studied.

Has more than two sets of lenses.

Has an eyepiece lens  (or ocular) and two or more sets of objective lenses

They sit on on a nosepiece that can revolve

The specimen is placed on the stage of this microscope.

Parts of the microscope

Label Microscope parts

  1. eyepiece (ocular) – where you look through to see the image

  2. body tube – Holds the eyepiece and connects it down to the objectives

  3. fine adjustment knob – Moves the body of the microscope up/down more slowly; fine control. Gets the specimen exactly focused. We only use this after we first use the coarse adjustment knob.

  4. nosepiece – rotating piece at the bottom of the body tube. Lets us choose between several lenses (objectives.)

  5. high power objective — used for high power magnification (the longer objective lens)

  6. low power objective — used for low power magnification

  7. diaphragm – controls amount of light going through the specimen

  8. light/mirror – source of light, usually found near the base of the microscope.

  9. base – supports the microscope

  10. coarse adjustment knob — Moves body of the microscope up/down more quickly; Gets specimen approximately focused.

  11. arm – Holds main part of the microscope to the base.

  12. stage clips – hold the slide in place.

  13. inclination joint – used to tilt the microscope

Learning Standards

College Board Standards for College Success: Science

LSM-PE.2.1.2 Gather data, based on observations of cell functions made using a microscope or on cell descriptions obtained from print material, that can be used as evidence to support the claim that there are a variety of cell types.

LSM-PE.2.2.1 Describe, based on observations of cells made using a microscope and on information gathered from print and electronic resources, the internal structures (and the functions of these structures) of different cell types (e.g., amoeba, fungi, plant root, plant leaf, animal muscle, animal skin).

2006 Massachusetts Science and Technology/Engineering Curriculum Framework

Inquiry, Experimentation, and Design in the Classroom: SIS2. Design and conduct scientific investigations. Properly use instruments, equipment, and materials (e.g., scales, probeware, meter sticks, microscopes, computers) including set-up, calibration (if required), technique, maintenance, and storage.

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