KaiserScience

Home » About » Women in Physics

Women in Physics

PIONEERING WOMEN OF PHYSICS

They discovered pulsars, found the first evidence of dark matter, pioneered mathematics, radioactivity, nuclear fission, elasticity, and computer programming, and have even stopped light. Perimeter celebrates women who made pioneering contributions to physics, often overcoming tremendous challenges to do so.

The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics is an independent research centre in foundational theoretical physics located in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

 

Marie Skłodowska Curie (1867 – 1934), was a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person and only woman to win twice, the only person to win twice in multiple sciences, and was part of the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes. She was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris. {Wikipedia, adapted}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT PERIMETER INSTITUTE

Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics is an independent, non-profit, scientific research organization working to advance our understanding of physical laws and develop new ideas about the very essence of space, time, matter, and information. Located in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, Perimeter also provides a wide array of research training and educational outreach activities to nurture scientific talent and share the importance of discovery and innovation among students, teachers, and the general public. In partnership with the Governments of Ontario and Canada, Perimeter is a successful example of public-private collaboration in scientific research, training, and outreach. http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/

 

More women in physics

Hertha Marks Aryton

Born Phoebe Sarah Hertha Ayrton, 1854 – 1923. A Jewish British engineer, mathematician, physicist, and inventor. She was awarded the Hughes Medal by the Royal Society for her work on electric arcs and ripples in sand and water…. In 1899, she was the first woman ever to read her own paper before the Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE), “The Hissing of the Electric Arc”. Shortly thereafter, Ayrton was elected the first female member of the IEE… Ayrton was also the first woman to win a prize from the institution, the Hughes Medal, awarded to her in 1906… By the late nineteenth century, Ayrton’s work in the field of electrical engineering was recognised more widely… At the International Congress of Women held in London in 1899, she presided over the physical science section. Ayrton also spoke at the International Electrical Congress in Paris in 1900.  {Wikipedia}

text

The Electric Arc Hertha Marks Ayrton

text

 

%d bloggers like this: