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Cellular respiration (Honors)

Cells are busy organic machines. Molecules are constantly being built, broken down, or transported. Every action takes a lot of energy. Where does this energy come from? The process of how a cell gets and uses energy is called cellular respiration.

Basic terminology

respiration = you breathing in and out air. Brings oxygen into your lungs, then into your bloodstream.

circulation = carries oxygenated blood from your lungs, to every cell in your body

cellular respiration = now within your cell, your cell uses the oxygen gas to release chemical energy from within food molecules (usually sugar, but also protein and fat)

Overview (simple version)

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Overview (Honors versions)

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cellular respiration flowchart

Learning Standards

Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks: Biology

8.MS-LS1-7. Use informational text to describe that food molecules, including carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, are broken down and rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support cell growth and/or release of energy.

HS-LS1-7. Use a model to illustrate that aerobic cellular respiration is a chemical process
whereby the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and new
bonds form, resulting in new compounds and a net transfer of energy.
Clarification Statements:
• Emphasis is on the conceptual understanding of the inputs and outputs of the process of aerobic cellular respiration.
• Examples of models could include diagrams, chemical equations, and conceptual models.
• The model should include the role of ATP for energy transfer in this process.
• Food molecules include sugars (carbohydrates), fats (lipids), and proteins.
State Assessment Boundary:
• Identification of the steps or specific processes involved in cellular respiration is not expected in state assessment

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1 Comment

  1. […] What Happens When There Isn’t Any Oxygen Left? […]

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