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Organic compounds

An organic compound is any member of a large class of gaseous, liquid, or solid chemical compounds whose molecules contain carbon. For historical reasons discussed below, a few types of carbon-containing compounds such as carbides, carbonates, simple oxides of carbon (such as CO and CO2), and cyanides are considered inorganic.[1] The distinction between organic and inorganic carbon compounds, while “useful in organizing the vast subject of chemistry… is somewhat arbitrary.”[2]
Organic chemistry is the science concerned with all aspects of organic compounds. Organic synthesis is the methodology of their preparation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_compound

Finally, organic compounds form the basis of all earthly life and constitute a significant part of human endeavors in chemistry. The bonding patterns open to carbon, with its valence of four—formal single, double, and triple bonds, as well as various structures with delocalized electrons—make the array of organic compounds structurally diverse, and their range of applications enormous. They either form the basis of, or are important constituents of, many commercial products including pharmaceuticals; petrochemicals and products made from them (including lubricants, solvents, etc.); plastics; fuels and explosives; etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_chemistry

naming organic compounds

https://people.ok.ubc.ca/pshipley/teaching/chem203/worksheets/nomenclature.pdf

http://www.kentchemistry.com/links/organic/orgonaming1.htm

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