KaiserScience

Home » Earth Science » Weather » Hurricanes

Hurricanes

Advertisements

This intro is from the NOAA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a scientific agency in the United States Department of Commerce that focuses on the oceans, major waterways, and the atmosphere.
______________________________________________________

A hurricane is a type of storm called a tropical cyclone, which forms over tropical or subtropical waters.

A tropical cyclone is a rotating low-pressure weather system that has organized thunderstorms but no fronts (a boundary separating two air masses of different densities).

Tropical cyclones with maximum sustained surface winds of less than 39 miles per hour (mph) are called tropical depressions. Those with maximum sustained winds of 39 mph or higher are called tropical storms.

When a storm’s maximum sustained winds reach 74 mph, it is called a hurricane. The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale is a 1 to 5 rating, or category, based on a hurricane’s maximum sustained winds. The higher the category, the greater the hurricane’s potential for property damage.

Hurricanes originate in the Atlantic basin, which includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico, the eastern North Pacific Ocean, and, less frequently, the central North Pacific Ocean.

A six-year rotating list of names, updated and maintained by the World Meteorological Organization, is used to identify these storms.

“Hurricane Season” begins on June 1 and ends on November 30, although hurricanes can, and have, occurred outside of this time frame. NOAA’s National Hurricane Center predicts and tracks these massive storm systems, which occur, on average, 12 times a year in the Atlantic basin.

How do hurricanes form

tba

NASA Tumblr hurricanes

How do hurricanes form? A step-by-step guide. Vox

Articles

Can we stop a hurricane

How strong can a hurricane get? A hurricane can be regarded as a Carnot heat engine.

Why Atlantic Hurricanes Don’t Form In Winter And Spring (Or Do They?)

Online lessons

Weather Wiz Kids: Hurricanes

Learning Standards

tba

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: