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Electric charges and fields

Electric charges and fields

Chapter 16: Electric Charge and Electric Field

  • 16.1: Static Electricity: Electric Charge and Its Conservation
  • 16.2: Electric Charge in the Atom
  • 16.3: Insulators and Conductors
  • 16.4: Induced Charge; the Electroscope
  • 16.5: Coulomb’s Law
  • 16.6: Solving Problems Involving Coulomb’s Law and Vectors
  • 16.7: The Electric Field
  • 16.8: Electric Field Lines
  • 16.9: Electric Fields and Conductors
  • 16.10: Electric Forces in Molecular Biology: DNA Structure and Replication
  • 16.11: Photocopy Machines and Computer Printers Use Electrostatics
  • 16.12: Gauss’s Law

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An electric field surrounds every charge P is an arbitrary point in space that we can examine. Every point in space feels some Electric field

The electric field is defined as the force on a small charge, divided by the magnitude of the charge:

E = F / q

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Gauss’s Law

 

In physics, Gauss’s law for magnetism is one of the four Maxwell’s equations that underlie classical electrodynamics. It states that the magnetic field B has divergence equal to zero,[1] in other words, that it is a solenoidal vector field. It is equivalent to the statement that magnetic monopoles do not exist. Rather than “magnetic charges”, the basic entity for magnetism is the magnetic dipole. (Of course, if monopoles were ever found, the law would have to be modified, as elaborated below.)

Gauss’s law for magnetism can be written in two forms, a differential form and an integral form. These forms are equivalent due to the divergence theorem.

  • Wikipedia

SlideShare on Maxwell’s Equations

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